On the tourist trail Part 1

This morning was taken up wandering around Nyaungshwe town, Shan State, on a quest for a cheaper guesthouse. It was hot and our backpacks are heavy and KG is still unwell. After the sixth monotonous  ‘…….No’, we scratched our heads, looked around and realized we’re surrounded by Chinese tourists. Busloads of them, literally. With new buses arriving every day. Now almost everything’s booked out. Ugh.

Tourism has been a major driver of Myanmar’s rapidly unfurling economy since the 1996 boycott was lifted three years ago. The number of international visitors shot up from 300,000 in 2010 to about a million in 2012; last year hit a record high of 2 million; and there’s a ‘Master Plan’ in place for a yearly forecast of 7.5 million by 2020. The service industry in a scramble to keep up is apparently experiencing some growing pains in the form of rising travel costs and hotel shortages. In the words of one European restaurant owner it’s ‘a big baby’, in need of intensive support and supervision. This means more trainings, HR, oversight, investment – the rusk sticks and Bonjela for economic teething woes.

This view was echoed even less diplomatically by an incensed young German one night in a bar, where we had found ourselves out late with a bunch of earlytwentysomething travelers. He had been in Bagan for 3 months trying to instil order and reason and systems of accountability into the hotel he had been somehow charged with managing.

After the second bottle of Myanmar beer, at the climax of a never-ending rant about his valiant but futile attempts to raise the baseline salaries of his unappreciative employees, he went a bit livid with sweat beads, bulging forehead veins and tense jaw muscles appearing. I think at one point even threw his large menacing hands up into the air in a display of moral despair.[1]

I guess with this sort of exponential influx it’s bound to be a bumpy ride. But from an economically ignorant outsider’s perspective things seem pretty on track. It’s true that often our requests to order something or inquire about room availability have been met with expressions of blank apathy, incomprehension and mild fear, and that most of the teenage-looking waiters and hotel receptionists don’t seem 100% engaged with their new jobs, and that the prices are a lot, lot higher than in good old Thailand. But aside from this morning’s room situation, I’ve felt all my touristy needs are being scarily well-catered to. In fact, everything’s too easy. I feel like a big tourist baby, one with some very big handfuls of kyats and US dollars on her person.

Economic efficiency is a laudable aim blah blah but I nevertheless hope the ongoing international influx doesn’t bring with it too many more German managers.

[1] N.B. Jerk factor aside, German/Burmese is not an ideal culture combination.

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